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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
, demanding strict new curbs on government surveillance. the national security agency checked far more user data than the companies realize. i am joined by a national technology reporter for the washington post. are the tech companies here motivated by principle or profit? >> i am guessing both. nobody likes having their stuff stolen, and that is what has happened here. it is bad business for users to think their information is going to be stolen if they give it to google or yahoo. they knew they were giving information to the u.s. government under court order. but the extent has taken this them by shock. data was selected from fiber on particular cables over southeast. >> what about the chance of a new law being passed? >> hard to know where this is going. the u.s. congress is not known for its efficiency. this has gotten the world's attention. i think the shape is early to tell, but i wouldn't be surprised to see some kind of act. >> doesn't the government have a case when it cease it needs all this information to protect national security. >> sure. if my job was to prevent titleist attac
six months since ed snowden revealed the effort ops the national security agency phones' now congressman roger is investigating whether ed snowden was working alone or whether other governments may have played a role. catherine herridge is in washington. other governments to whom is he referring here? >> if you take a close review of the nasa nasa -- national security agency leaked documents they talk about the works overseas, and the chairman of the house intelligence committee, who gets regular brief examination -- briefings, says there is now evidence suggesting edward snowden had helped when he downloaded 200,000 documents. >> we know he did some things capability wise that were beyond his capabilities, meaning he used someone else's help to steal things from the people of the united states, classified information, information we use to keep america safe. >> and the former head of the nsa and said that his activities have permanently damaged u.s. security. >> it's very, very hard. this is the -- this is catastrophic for the safety and security of the american nation. what
extensive the national security agency really is. they have spent years spying on online gamers, including those playing on world of workout. in obamacare architect ezekiel emanuel says people haven't signed up for coverage because the obama administration has not sufficiently promoted it. my next guest says he couldn't write a greater piece of fiction in the obamacare narrative. we are joined now by best-selling author in his latest book. i was going to make a remark about a number of things. i will constrain myself. ezekiel emanuel, saying if you really want to keep your doctor, the obama deal is just to pay up. >> so what is he telling us? in obamacare works if you're rich. so if you're rich, you get to have choices and we heard that certain high and technologically advanced hospitals are being dropped off of all these insurance plans. and again, don't get access to the doctor you wanted the best health care system you can possibly have unless you are rich and that is the bottom line, which is a stunner coming from the high progressives to. >> the idea, that these hospitals would be exc
. the details come from edward snowden, who leaked a trove of material from the national security agency last summer. intelligence officials maintain the data collection operation has thwarted a number of terror attacks. a presidential advisory panel has been reviewing the issue. its findings could come this week. we hear now from the tech world. brad smith is the general counsel and an executive vice president of microsoft. he's also speaking on behalf of the companies that signed today's letter. >> brad smith, welcome to the program. what is it that the government is doing that microsoft and the other companies want them to stop? well, throughout our industry we're concerned about the increasing reports that government surveillance including in the u.s. but also elsewhere has gone beyond what people understood. we see a need for reform. and specifically we're hoping that there will be clear legal rules, all of this should take place pursuant to the law there should be stronger executive oversight there needs to be enhanced review by the courts. and there needs to be a bit more transparency,
. the letter follows information leaked by former national security agency contract for edward snowden, who leaked details of the secret programs. >> the nation's largest gay rights group says that corporate support for gay and trans and gender workers is reaching new course in the country. the a human- rights campaigner, but more than two-thirds of fortune 500 companies and 90% all the large employers its survey are not offering spousal benefits to the same sex the domestic partners. the group's 12th and will corporate quality index also found a record number of business is adopting the policy prohibiting discrimination against trans gender workers in job applications. >> the merger of american airlines and u.s. air ways has formed an air travel giant larger than the current industry leader, denied continental holdings. the new company will be called american airlines. passengers likely will not see this merger e. neely. ticketing and frequent flyer programs are expected to be combined. >> watching gas prices this morning. and the average price for a gallon of regular gasoline is up 3¢. a
snooping. according to the washington post the u -s national security agency was intercepting traffic inside google's and yahoo's private networks. and microsoft fears that the n- s -a may have broken into their global communications as well. microsoft plans to encrypt data flowing through all of its communication, productivity services. google and yahoo have announced that they will also move forward with encryption initiatives. a frosty morning. president barack obama is defending the national security agency saying it does a very good job of not engaging in domestic surveillance. that was his response to a recent report that the agency tracks locations of nearly 5 billion cellphone every day overseas including those of americans. the president says he will propose " some self restraint " on the agency after a panel of hand-picked advisers reports back this month. he also says the nsa isn't interested in reading people's image and text messages. stanley roberts who found some people behaving badly. drivers and bicyclist have to share the road. that is an undisputed fact grid and if
government snooping according to the washington post, the u.s. national security agency was intercepting traffic inside kugels and yahoos private networks. --google's. and microsoft fears that the nsa may have broken into their global communications as well. microsoft plans to encrypt data flowing through all of its communication, productive and the services. google. and yahoo have announced they will also move forward with encryption initiatives. >>darya: starbucks is selling its limited edition $450 gift cards. and they are expected to go fast. these cards are metal every loaded with $400 a enough money to keep decaffeinated coffee year long. however, there is a catch, you can't get these cards and stores. you can only buy them on the flash still website gilt.com. they're also expected to be an even higher demand a share because these are your cards to buy. -there are fewer cards to buy. the company is only selling 8000 parts instead of the 5000 cards it offered last year. the cards go on sale today at noon. last year the cars sold out and about six minutes. >>james: and this year into
." the letter follow revelations by former national security agency contractor edward snowden, who leaked details of the secret programs that critics say violate privacy rights >> i will highlight more of the weather when we return. >> ice, snow, and cold weather are causing problems all over the country. in addition to stranding numerous drivers and causing thousands of flight cancellations, andrew spencer reports the wintry storms are causing damage. >> it looks like an onion lucky place for you to have parked your car. it did not happen just once, rooftops were so heavy that have allegis failed to the street. take a look at some of the damage. the interstate was shut down does not see snow especially not like this. many drivers in little rock, ark. are used to the ice conditions. >> the residential areas are not clear. >> take a look at this the view from this error plane. across the country the weather cost thousands of flights to be canceled. so many people were stuck in dallas that they started to provide food for them. even the white house and the capital got a little bit of a dust
be under surveillancy the n.s.a. they said the national security agency is tracking 5 billion cell phones every day. the paper cited documents from edward snowden. it means the spy agency could track the movement of almost any cell phone around the world. n.s.a. officials refused to comment, but said they don't collect data on sell phones in the united states. >>> tonight a new meningitis outbreak at the university of california, santa barbara o initials are racing to stop the bacteria spreading. brian rooney has more. >> four students at this cancer developed a rare form of meningitis in three weeks. one in four who catch it dee. 20% suffer permanent damage. >> when the outbreak started, when we had three cases two weeks ago, three cases in two weeks was a dangerous situation. >> a student, a freshman la cross player had such a serious case that both his feet had to be amputated. >> once it causes bloodpoichg, sepsis can be so overwelcoming, the body is tox. >>, and hand and feet are overwhelmed with infection andar amputated. >> students you warned to avoid close contact, sharing drinks
's the number of cell phone records the national security agency is reportedly collecting every day. that's five billion per day with a b. top secret do you means leaked by edward snowden reportedly show that they contract individuals and map their relationships. the agency said they collect data incidentally and not deliberately. next number, $5,000, actually it's $5,000 and a car is the amount rob ford reportedly offered a drug dealer in exchange for a potentially incriminating video that showed the mayor smoke smoking crack. the dealer refused to sell the video and wanted to hold on to the insurance policy. three is the number of times dennis rodman will have traveled to north korea. he announced he planned to go back on december 18th. he is training the north korean basketball team for a match. we say game in america. a game in january. rodman developed a close friendship with the dictator kim jung un. 28 inches is how much snow has been dropped in the last 24 hours in part parts of the midwest. two harbors. minnesota got slammed. that's a town there. schools are closed and roads are impassi
.s. national security agency is directing billions of records of mobile phone locations every day. how a mobile phone can be turned into a tracking device. >> wherever you are in the world, as soon as you switch on your mobile phone, it tries to connect to the mobile network. usually through the closest tower. as soon as it does, your phone number is logged with the network, along with which tower you have connected to. which means your location. >> if you are on the move, anyone with tract your rout. by gathering and processing 5 billion records each day, to see which individuals are traveling or meeting together. here is how it works. >> you may be connected to a tower, along with 100 other people. you move down the street, and automatically connects to the next closest tower. say 20 of the 100 are moving in the same direction you move further down the road, and say just five of the original 100 people, join you. a couple more towers and some time later just one person who is mirrored your movements. the assumption, you have some reason for being together. >> it raise as lot of question. it c
of responsibility. apply online or visit a bank of america near you. >>> the super secret national security agency actively monitoring hundreds of millions of cell phones around the world. that, according to today's "the washington post" based on top secret documents divulged by edward snowden. they reveal the spy agency's gathering 5 billion cell phone records every 24 hours. brian todd is looking into the story. cell phones belonging to american as well, are they part of this? >> inadvertently, yes. the nsa, as you no, not allowed to spy on americans and senior u.s. intelligence official tells evan peres the location program, the one reported on, is focused on foreign targets. and the nsa says it does not intentionally target american but was the whereabouts the phones of some americans overseas and some in the u.s. could be collected inadvertently in these operations. a senior u.s. official tells perez they try to minimize that when an innocent american's cell phone's location is collected they try remove that from the database as soon as collected. they're trying to minimize and avoid targetin
. and the "washington post" reported the national security agency collects roughly five billion records a day on the location of cell phones worldwide, based on documents leaked by former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden. >> woodruff: on the "newshour" online right now, archaeologists have discovered that we're all mutts. new tests on the oldest-known human d.n.a. reveal that homo sapiens have more ancestors than we had previously thought. read about that on our science page. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. >> ifill: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. on thursday, fast-food workers plan strikes in 100 cities across the country to protest low-wages. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening. for all of us here at the "pbs newshour," thank you and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie calle
. >>> new details about how the national security agency gathers nearly 5 billion cell phone records around the world every day. those records are put into a huge database that contract the movements of individuals, map their relationships, how they're connected work they're calling were creates a web of information. >> bringing in our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr, on this story because, barbara, you hear about all of this, the cell phone locations and who they're trying to trace, is it americans, americans living abroad, how expansive is this, if you're overseas and you're on the phone? >> reporter: well, we don't know a lot about how expansive it is. "the washington post" reporting that this all came from more leaks by, guess who, edward snowden and documents that he had, and that is it about 5 billion cell phone records a day. how much does it affect americans? well, by all accounts, if you're an american, you're out of the country on business or may vation, you pick up your cell phone, use it, that call that record of that call, not the conversation itself, is most likely to be
the story about the national security agency basically patrolling all of the cell phones in the world, basically. a lot of young people point to the privacy requirements. they don't like being part of anything that's collecting information. health care. is this going to be one of the detriments for people signing up, they want to keep their privacy. >> first of all, health care is entirely different. it's more similar to seniors who sign up for medicare, people who file their taxes. you know, there are a whole bunch of things where you're providing information to the government. it's protected. it's governed by a whole series of laws. the nsa issues a broader issue. young people are rightly sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and maintain internet freedom. and so i am. that's part of not just our first amendment rights and expectations in this country, but it's particularly something that young people care about because they spend so much time texting and, you know, instagraming. >> whatever. >> something's coming up every single day. so all of us spend more and more of o
they understand the need for the national security agency to protect american citizens, they think the snooping has gone too far. plus, of course, it's bad for business. the companies have been getting hammered with consumer complaints ever since leaked documents revealed the extent to which the nsa tracks internet and cell phone communications. according to the "washington post" the latest document dump showed the agency collects about five billion cell phone records a day. >>> coming up on "the lead," take football and snow, lots of snow, mix in a dash of lesean mccoy, what do you get? well, dare i say perfection. highlights from the craziest sunday in recent memory, next. and it feels like your lifeate revolves around your symptoms, ask your gastroenterologist about humira adalimumab. humira has been proven to work for adults who have tried other medications but still experience the symptoms of moderate to severe crohn's disease. in clinical studies, the majority of patients on humira saw significant symptom relief, and many achieved remission. humira can lower your ability to fight infectio
.remely other concerns involved in the u.s., has a national security agencies monitoring and mitigation scheme to diplomatic relations between colombia and the u.s.? -- monitoring communications, kate e maddock between clinton and the u.s.? between colombia and the u.s.? >> we share with the u.s. and other intelligence agencies all of the information in there for spied therefore if we had on our common enemies, it has been done with the cooperation of the colombian authorities and u.s. authorities. information off spying outside that spirit of cooperation. if i knew about that, of course i would condemn it immediately. >> some of your neighbors in latin america have been furious by revelations of u.s. eavesdropping. is there anger justified? >> nobody likes to be spied. , if some and spies on you, you have all the right to get mad. they are spying without permission. to china, china's investment in latin america continues to grow. the country signed bilateral agreements last week. can you tell us more about that columbia-china economic relationship? do you see the effect it would have on that
, give us a call. guest: with the national security agency's eavesdropping ask posers your car he was saying here is not aware that the united states is eavesdropping on the german chancellor's personal cell phone. obviously the glitches to the health care website is another that he has acknowledged he was not prepared for. on their own, these may seem relatively minor, but added up you get the perception of a white house and a management team there that is trying to do a lot of different things at the same time and not speaking for the american people. he wasn't speaking for insurance companies. this does make him a liar. i just want to talk about legacy. it can be before he leaves office or after. is going to rule obama and hillary. they were trying to protect votes through consistent lives using various people as spokespeople and also, the perception they did not need -- they were so successful in we do not have to increase security. the second issue, another 15 seconds and i'm done. the of audible care at is nothing more than a trojan horse , the getting reparations for slaver
,000. >>> the latest bombshell from documents leaked by edward snowden. the national security agency reportedly tracks the locations of up to 5 billion cell phone overseas including those belonging to americans. the "washington post" reports the nsa is unintentionally gathering that information, including the name of the person called. the nsa has said it does not gather data on american cell phones inside the u.s. >>> european regulators have levied major fines against eight financial firms including two giant american banks. citigroup and jpmorgan chase are among the bank fined $2 billion for rigging interest rates. the commission said it was shocking to find so many banks that should have been competing against one another colluding instead. >>> the brutal snowstorm that shut down schools tapering off this morning but more unbearably cold air moving in. people in northern minnesota are racing to dig out from two feet of snow before the plunging temperatures turn everything in to ice. the slick roads are blamed for hundreds of accidents. >>> people in montana braving the coldest temperatures in year
edward snowden reveals a massive program by the national security agency to track the location of cell phones around the world. according to "washington post" they are gathering 5 billion records a day on the location of cell phones oversee seas -- overseas. the nsa's tracking program may be the reason that president obama is not allowed to have an iphone. there may be concern that phones could easily reveal his location. apple's smartphone is a favorite of nsa agents because iphone's operating system has 38 different features that can be tracked. >>> 8:16. more incriminating allegations against the mayor of toronto, rob ford. newly-released court documents indicate gang members may have had a video of mayor ford smoking crack cocaine. the documents describe wiretap recordings of gang members talking about black mailing the mayor. reportedly police did recover a copy of the video from a laptop computer. >>> the man accused of a deadly shooting in san francisco over a popular gaming system is due back in court on monday to enter a plea. 21-year-old ronnie collins made his first court ap
was concerned with raining and the national security agency they would have to go after the funding. congress must be happy the way things are going because they don't seem to want to do anything about it. that is all i have to say. robert is on our line for independents. caller: i would like to i heard asay that recent blurb regarding president obama's attempt to rein in nsa surveillance. rathertly think it is disingenuous. it doesn't really matter what administration is in office. council,nal security these are agencies that are so entrenched in our government. they basically operate through a black budget. a lot of money that was siphoned through taxes are going to be totally off the books. it doesn't matter what any president or any policy -- they want to operate independent of the administration and the office. beware of the military and industrial complex. bob is on our line for democrats. caller: i would like to remind folks that when george bush was trying to pass to this -- pass this patriots act, the big response to people worried about losing their freedom or thatty's or whatever w
are serious speakers who dealt with the agency's new said we should always treat national security with proper skepticism. the only story which any member of parliament directly referred to, the dep internet if anybody is interested. >> the second question is sanderson, the river to are announced this whole issue of information in the u. k, i will summarize what he said is the free press to hold the government to account, and the guardians played investigations, joining that, is it in this issue? and any author for this information? >> i think we just had a long and tortured debate about medicine and during that debate we heard repeated answers for all three party leaders that politicians would not interfere in the press and it seems to me the very first hurdle, parliament is in danger, and the transit of journalists. and we didn't want this in the public been. and intelligence agencies, once it is in the hands of the press, the press must be protected and the wonderful thing about america is a lesson we are still learning in this country. >> my question is in relation to the part that your ne
, with the director of national intelligence, with the fbi, with the nsa, with the national security council, and with the pentagon. this country it's included downing street, the cabinet office, the national security advisor, gchq themselves, and the dinas committee. we've consulted more than 100 times with the agencies in order to be aware of their concerns before we published them. >> and so i suppose my question is, have you gone through all of the 53,000 documents? and have some been excluded from publication? will they not be appearing. have others been put in the yes, okay for publication? >> i think -- in terms of publishing documents, i think we've published 26. >> i'm referring to the ones which have not yet been. >> we did a few more pages of documents that have been redacted. i would not expect us to publish a huge amount of more. 26 over six months. >> what about the ones that have been communicated to the united states. because i understand some of those, the names have been redacted and some of them haven't. how did you go about deciding which names to redact and which not --
house, with the director of national intelligence, with he fbi, with the nsa, with the national security council, and with the pentagon. this country it's included downing street, the cabinet security e national advisor, gchq themselves, and dinas committee. we've consulted more than 100 times with the agencies in order be aware of their concerns before we published them. so i suppose my question is, have you gone through all of 53,000 documents? and have some been excluded from publication? will they not be appearing. have others been put in the yes, publication? >> i think -- in terms of ublishing documents, i think we've published 26. >> i'm referring to the ones yet been. not >> we did a few more pages of ocuments that have been redacted. publishnot expect us to a huge amount of more. 26 over six months. the ones that have been communicated to the united states. because i understand some of hose, the names have been redacted and some of them haven't. how did you go about deciding names to redact and which not -- the guardian ear, has not used any names. in the rare occasion where we'
, who had dealt with the agencies, who say we should always treat the claims of national security with proper. the only story which is a member of parliament has directly referred to was the so-called deacon net, which i'm happy to talk about if anyone's interested. >> thank you. second question is stay in anniston, the u.s. repertoire and counterterrorism just announced will be looking into this whole issue of intelligent and information given by the u.s. and the u.k. -underscore december said. they hold the government to account and some on suggestions from the tories and the investigation on the tabloid newspapers joining not. are you welcoming the u.n. investigation into this issue about the whole issue about getting an offer of information to the extent that? >> absolutely. we just had a long debate about levin said. during that debate, we heard repeated assurances from all party theaters that the competitions for not interfering the press. and i seems to me a very close hurdle parliament is in danger of farming. as i say, i put earlier that the general counsel of the nsa, so
a lot in. good to see you. >> thanks. >>> time to show you headlines. the national security agents is not alone in collecting cell phone data. it's used by local and state police. public records show dozens of agencies grab information from phones while in use. >>> in california the american held in north korea made it home. 85-year-old newman spent six weeks of detention in a comfortable hotel. he says he ate well and was bored at times. newman was detained during the ten day visit to north korea. he was freed friday after reading the apology for his you service during the korean war. >>> los angeles times says many attended the memorial for paul walker. walker was the star of "fast & furious" movies. he was k >>> that cold arctic air continues to settle in over the bay area, at least a couple more days here before we start to warm things up. as we look out over the golden gate bridge, mostly clear skies now and going the stay that way all day long, but the temperatures are going to be chilly. by the afternoon, highs expected in the upper 40s and the
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)